The archive is catalogued by 'Economics', 'Politics', 'Mockingbird', 'And in other news' and 'Thoughts on other things' 

MarkGB 

"Who controls the food supply controls the people; who controls the energy can control whole continents; who controls money can control the world" - Henry Kissinger

and yet...

"Sooner or later everyone sits down to a banquet of consequences" – Robert Louis Stevenson

Gideon Rachman says Angela Merkel should guard press freedom - then my comment is deleted. Irony bypass?

In response to an FT article by Gideon Rachman on 18th April 2016, entitled 'Angela Merkel should guard press freedom'

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/c57acf60-0548-11e6-9b51-0fb5e65703ce.html#ixzz46CBUpo9C

THIS POST WAS CENSORED BY THE FT AS DESCRIBED BELOW. READERS CAN MAKE UP THEIR OWN MIND ABOUT THAT.

Thank you Mr Rachman!

I fully support your efforts in highlighting this ridiculous pandering, and thanks also for giving us all an opportunity to serve this pompous and self-righteous twittery with the ridicule it deserves. I hope I will have your support in return...Here is a little homage to the latest politician who is so far up his wotsit that he thinks he is in some way crucial to the well being of the planet. Alas for the poor dear, he is not. The rhythm of this little 2 verse ditty is that of the limerick:

A bloated old ego called Recep

Said he wanted to rule from a precept

That he was the best

So he puffed out his chest

But alas he still looked like a reject

 

Yes, that trumped up old chap called Erdogan

Liked to gather up journos and flog em

He thought he was bad

Even ‘arder than Vlad

But he was sadly no tougher than Gollum

***

SHORTLY AFTERWARDS THE POST WAS REMOVED BY THE FT

A fellow reader P commented: "Well I just got to the 2nd verse and it suddenly disappeared. The FT team are obviously so yellow they a quaking at the knees if MarkGB dares to post a comment. How sad FT"

Another reader M added: "There's a lesson there, much louder than any self-congratulatory article"

I replied to both: 

There is indeed. It's one thing to preach about free speech. Another thing entirely, to uphold it. This is the second Gideon Rachman article within the past week where I have had a piece removed for being irreverent to the egos of self-important people. No doubt whoever removed it could cook up some 'bylaw' to justify it on other grounds. Censors always do.

The previous piece was in response to Mr Rachman's 'Boris Johnson, David Cameron and the day after Brexit'. My spoof was entitled 'The FT Executive Tearoom - the day after Brexit'; it lasted barely longer than this one.

Of course, it still exists on my blog, MarkGB dot the other thing, (sorry but web addresses attract the 'pending' robot), along with a little note outlining the removal, inviting readers to make up their own mind. This sad tale will get the same treatment there.

It only remains to be seen how long this post lasts here :-)  THUS FAR IT IS STILL THERE

***

Reader M summed it up nicely:

"Seriously, Gideon, and with all respect, the deleting of MarkGB's posting of an innocuous poem mocking a political leader in an article about the freedom of the press makes your talk of a "free press" giggle-worthy (if one were prone to giggling). It also makes the writer of such sentiments seem horrifically naive"

Gideon Rachman:  "Fair point. The paradox only struck me after it had been deleted"

Reader T offered a thought: "Gideon, you could always reinstate it"

THE POST HAS NOT BEEN REINSTATED. 

Finally:

"In an authoritarian state, presidents and prime ministers demand and receive reverential treatment. In democratic countries, political leaders know that they will be subject to satire…In the coming years, protecting press freedom is likely to cost Europeans contracts and money. It will cause diplomatic headaches and sometimes it will be dangerous. If Europeans bend and compromise fundamental freedoms, they may gain money and a quiet life but they will lose their self-respect, and ultimately the respect of the world" - Gideon Rachman

George Osborne plays his trump card - serious financial institutions all agree we should vote 'remain'.

European stability is at risk, but it's not because of 'Germany's local roots'